CMI Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines

Colorado School of Mines offers courses in several areas:


Geology Engineering/Geochemistry

  • GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 Hours.  (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
  • GEGN206. EARTH MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours. (II) Introduction to Earth Materials, emphasizing the structure, composition, formation, and behavior of minerals. Laboratories emphasize the recognition, description, and engineering evaluation of earth materials. Prerequisite: GEGN101, GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
  • GEGN401. MINERAL DEPOSITS. 4.0 Hours. (I) Introductory presentation of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic ore deposits. Chemical, petrologic, structural, and sedimentological processes that contribute to ore formation. Description of classic deposits representing individual deposit types. Review of exploration sequences. Laboratory consists of hand specimen study of host rock-ore mineral suites and mineral deposit evaluation problems. Prerequisite: CHGN209, GEGN307, GEGN316, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
  • GEGN432. GEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours. (I) Techniques for managing and analyzing geological data, including statistical analysis procedures and computer programming. Topics addressed include elementary probability, populations and distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of data sequences, mapping, sampling and sample representativity, linear regression, and overview of univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Practical experience with principles of software programming and statistical analysis for geological applications via suppled software and data sets from geological case histories. Prerequistes: Senior standing in Geological Engineering or permission of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
  • GEOL321. MINERALOGY AND MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION. 3.0 Hours. (I) Principles of mineralogy and mineral characterization. Crystallography of naturally occurring materials. Principles of crystal chemistry. Interrelationships among mineral structure, external shape, chemical composition, and physical properties. Introduction to mineral stability. Laboratories emphasize analytical methods, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. Prerequisite: GEGN101, CHGN122, GEGN206. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab: 3 semester hours.
  • GEOL515. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS. 3.0 Hours. (I) Geology of mineral systems at a deposit, district, and regional scale formed by magmatic-hydrothermal, sedimentary/basinal, and metamorphic processes. Emphasis will be placed on a systems approach to evaluating metal and sulfur sources, transportation paths, and traps. Systems examined will vary by year and interest of the class. Involves a team-oriented research project that includes review of current literature and laboratory research. Prerequisites: GEGN401 or consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 5 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
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  • CHGC503. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY. 4.0 Semester Hrs. A comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts and principles of geochemistry, coupled with a thorough overview of the related principles of thermodynamics. Topics covered include: nucleosynthesis, origin of earth and solar system, chemical bonding, mineral chemistry, elemental distributions and geochemical cycles, chemical equilibrium and kinetics, isotope systematics, and organic and biogeochemistry. Prerequisite: Introductory chemistry, mineralogy and petrology. 4 hours lecture, 4 semester hours.
  • CHGC504. METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY. 2.0 Hours. Sampling of natural earth materials including rocks, soils, sediments, and waters. Preparation of naturally heterogeneous materials, digestions, and partial chemical extractions. Principles of instrumental analysis including atomic spectroscopy, mass separations, and chromatography. Quality assurance and quality control. Interpretation and assessment of geochemical data using statistical methods. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geochemistry or environmental science and engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
  • CHGC509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS GEOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours. Analytical, graphical and interpretive methods applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic properties of water and aqueous solutions. Calculations and graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-mineral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on natural aqueous systems. Adsorption and ion exchange equilibria between clays and oxide phases. Behavior of trace elements and complexation in aqueous systems. Application of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous systems. Light stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous systems. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CHGC511. GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS. 3.0 Hours. A survey of the geochemical characteristics of the various types of igneous rock suites. Application of major element, trace element, and isotope geochemistry to problems of their origin and modification. Prerequisite: Undergraduate mineralogy and petrology or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
  • CHGC514. GEOCHEMISTRY THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS. 3.0 Hours. (II) Fundamental principles of classical thermodynamics and kinetics with specific application to the earth sciences. Volume-temperature ?pressure relationships for solids, liquids, gases and solutions. Energy and the First Law, Entropy and the Second and Third Laws. Gibbs Free Energy, chemical equilibria and the equilibrium constant. Solutions and activity-composition relationships for solids, fluids and gases. Phase equilibria and the graphical representation of equilibira. Application of the fundamentals of kinetics to geochemical examples. Prerequisite: Introductory chemistry, introductory thermodynamics, mineralogy and petrology, or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered in alternate years.
  • CHGN502. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours. (II) Detailed examination of topics such as ligand field theory, reaction mechanisms, chemical bonding, and structure of inorganic compounds. Emphasis is placed on the correlations of the chemical reactions of the elements with periodic trends and reactivities. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CHGN503. ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 Hours. (II) Quantum chemistry of classical systems. Principles of chemical thermodynamics. Statistical mechanics with statistical calculation of thermodynamic properties. Theories of chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
  • CHGN507. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours. (I) Review of fundamentals of analytical chemistry. Literature of analytical chemistry and statistical treatment of data. Manipulation of real substances; sampling, storage, decomposition or dissolution, and analysis. Detailed treatment of chemical equilibrium as related to precipitation, acid-base, complexation and redox titrations. Potentiometry and UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CHGN508. ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY. 3.0 Hours. (II) Detailed study of classical and modern spectroscopic methods; emphasis on instrumentation and application to analytical chemistry problems. Topics include: UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence, Raman spectroscopy, arc and spark emission spectroscopy, flame methods, nephelometry and turbidimetry, reflectance methods, Fourier transform methods in spectroscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, rapid-scanning spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
  • CHGN510. CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS. 3.0 Hours. (II) Survey of separation methods, thermodynamics of phase equilibria, thermodynamics of liquid-liquid partitioning, various types of chromatography, ion exchange, electrophoresis, zone refining, use of inclusion compounds for separation, application of separation technology for determining physical constants, e.g., stability constants of complexes. Prerequisite: CHGN507 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
  • CHGN580. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours. (II) Application of X-ray diffraction techniques for crystal and molecular structure determination of minerals, inorganic and organometallic compounds. Topics include the heavy atom method, data collection by moving film techniques and by diffractometers, Fourier methods, interpretation of Patterson maps, refinement methods, direct methods. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.

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Mining Engineering

(http://bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/programs/earthscieng/miningengineering/#courseinventory)

  • MNGN210. INTRODUCTORY MINING (I, II) Survey of mining and mining economics. Topics include mining law, exploration and reserve estimation, project evaluation, basic unit operations, sustainability and lifecycle engineering in mining, introduction to regulatory processes and environmental considerations, and an introduction to surface and underground mining methods. Prerequisite: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours.
  • MNGN222. INTRODUCTION TO EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING A basic introduction to explosive engineering and applied explosive science for students that recently completed their freshman or sophomore years at CSM. Topics covered will include safety and explosive regulations, chemistry of explosives, explosives physics, and detonation properties. The course features a significant practical learning component with several sessions held at the Explosives Research Laboratory in Idaho Springs. Students completing this course will be well prepared for more advanced work in MNGN 333 and MNGN 444. Prerequisites: PHGN100, MATH111, MATH112, CHGN121, and CHGN122. 3 hours lecture, 3 credit hours.
  • MNGN312. SURFACE MINE DESIGN (I) (WI) Analysis of elements of surface mine operation and design of surface mining system components with emphasis on minimization of adverse environmental impact and maximization of efficient and sustainable use of mineral resources. Ore estimates, unit operations, equipment selection, final pit determinations, short- and long-range planning, life cycle aspects of design, road layouts, dump planning, and cost estimation. Prerequisite: MNGN210 and MNGN300. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 credit hours.
  • MNGN314. UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN. 3.0 Hours. (II) Selection, design, and development of most suitable underground mining methods based upon the physical and the geological properties of mineral deposits (metallics and nonmetallics), conservation considerations, and associated environmental impacts. Reserve estimates, development and production planning, engineering drawings for development and extraction, underground haulage systems, and cost estimates. Prerequisite: MNGN210 and MNGN300. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
  • MNGN321. INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS Physical properties of rock, and fundamentals of rock substance and rock mass response to applied loads. Principles of elastic analysis and stress-strain relationships. Elementary principles of the theoretical and applied design of underground openings and pit slopes. Emphasis on practical applied aspects. Prerequisite: DCGN241 or MNGN317. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 credit hours.
  • MNGN322. INTRODUCTION TO MINERAL PROCESSING AND LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours. (I) Principles and practice of crushing, grinding, size classification; mineral concentration technologies including magnetic and electrostatic separation, gravity separation, and flotation. Sedimentation, thickening, filtration and product drying as well as tailings disposal technologies are included. The course is open to all CSM students. Prerequisite: PHGN200/ 210, MATH213/223. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
  • MNGN404. TUNNELING. 3.0 Hours. (I) Modern tunneling techniques. Emphasis on evaluation of ground conditions, estimation of support requirements, methods of tunnel driving and boring, design systems and equipment, and safety. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MNGN406. DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND EXCAVATIONS. 3.0 Hours. Design of underground excavations and support. Analysis of stress and rock mass deformations around excavations using analytical and numerical methods. Collections, preparation, and evaluation of in situ and laboratory data for excavation design. Use of rock mass rating systems for site characterization and excavation design. Study of support types and selection of support for underground excavations. Use of numerical models for design of shafts, tunnels and large chambers. Prerequisite: Instructor?s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
  • MNGN414. MINE PLANT DESIGN. 3.0 Hours. (I) Analysis of mine plant elements with emphasis on design. Materials handling, dewatering, hoisting, belt conveyor and other material handling systems for underground mines. Prerequisite: MNGN312, MNGN314 or Instructor?s consent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hour.
  • MNGN427. MINE VALUATION. 2.0 Hours. (II) Course emphasis is on the business aspects of mining. Topics include time valuation of money and interest formulas, cash flow, investment criteria, tax considerations, risk and sensitivity analysis, escalation and inflation and cost of capital. Calculation procedures are illustrated by case studies. Computer programs are used. Prerequisite: Senior in Mining, graduate status or Instructor?s consent. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
  • MNGN438. GEOSTATISTICS. 3.0 Hours. (I) Introduction to elementary probability theory and its applications in engineering and sciences; discrete and continuous probability distributions; parameter estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression; spatial correlations and geostatistics with emphasis on applications in earth sciences and engineering. Prerequisites: MATH112. 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab. 3 semester hours.
  • MNGN424. MINE VENTILATION. 3.0 Hours. (II) Fundamentals of mine ventilation, including control of gas, dust, temperature, and humidity; ventilation network analysis and design of systems. Prerequisite: MEGN351, MEGN361 and MNGN314 or Instructor?s consent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

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Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science

  • MTGN311. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours. (I) Principles of crystallography and crystal chemistry. Characterization of crystalline materials using X-ray diffraction techniques. Applications to include compound identification, lattice parameter measurement, orientation of single crystals, and crystal structure determination. Prerequisites: PHGN200 or PHGN210 and MTGN202. Co-requisite: MTGN311L. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN334. Chemical Processing Of Materials. (II) Development and application of fundamental principles related to the processing of metals and materials by thermochemical and aqueous and fused salt electrochemical/chemical routes. The course material is presented within the framework of a formalism that examines the physical chemistry, thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and kinetics inherent to a wide selection of chemical processing systems. The general formalism provides for a transferable knowledge-base to other systems not specifically covered in the course. Prerequisite: MTGN272, MTGN351 and EPIC251, Co-requisite: MTGN334L. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN351. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours. (I) Applications of thermodynamics in extractive and physical metallurgy and materials science. Thermodynamics of solutions including solution models, calculation of activities from phase diagrams, and measurements of thermodynamic properties of alloys and slags. Reaction equilibria with examples in alloy systems and slags. Phase stability analysis. Thermodynamic properties of phase diagrams in material systems, defect equilibrium and interactions. Prerequisite: CHGN209. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN381. INTRODUCTION TO PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN MATERIALS SYSTEMS. 2.0 Hours. (I) Review of the concepts of chemical equilibrium and derivation of the Gibbs phase rule. Application of the Gibbs phase rule to interpreting one, two and three component phase equilibrium diagrams. Application to alloy and ceramic materials systems. Emphasis on the evolution of phases and their amounts and the resulting microstructural development. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MTGN351. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
  • MTGN348. MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours. (II) An introduction to the relationships between microstructure and properties of materials, with emphasis on metallic and ceramic systems; Fundamentals of imperfections in crystalline materials on material behavior; recrystallization and grain growth; strengthening mechanisms: grain refinement, solid solution strengthening, precipitation strengthening, and microstructural strengthening; and phase transformations. Prerequisite: MTGN311 and MTGN351. Co-requisite: MTGN348L. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN352. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS KINETICS. 3.0 Hours. (II) Introduction to reaction kinetics: chemical kinetics, atomic and molecular diffusion, surface thermodynamics and kinetics of interfaces and nucleation-and-growth. Applications to materials processing and performance aspects associated with gas/solid reactions, precipitation and dissolltion behavior, oxidation and corrosion, purification of semiconductors, carburizing of steel, formation of p-n junctions and other important materials systems. Prerequisite: MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN431. Hydro- And Electro-Metallurgy(I) Physicochemical principles associated with the extraction and refining of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical techniques. Discussion of unit processes in hydrometallurgy, electrowinning, and electrorefining. Analysis of integrated flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals. Prerequisites: MTGN334, MTGN351 and MTGN352. Co-requisite: MTGN461, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN432. Pyrometallurgy(II) Extraction and refining of metals including emerging practices. Modifications driven by environmental regulations and by energy minimization. Analysis and design of processes and the impact of economic constraints. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN445. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours. (I) Mechanical properties and relationships. Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relationships of microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture, creep, and fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Co-requisite: MTGN445L. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN450. STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS. 3.0 Hours. (I) Introduction to statistical process control, process capability analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical process control theory and techniques developed and applied to control charts for variables and attributes involved in process control and evaluation. Process capability concepts developed and applied to the evaluation of manufacturing processes. Theory of designed experiments developed and applied to full factorial experiments, fractional factorial experiments, screening experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture experiments. Analysis of designed experiments by graphical and statistical techniques. Introduction to computer software for statistical process control and for the design and analysis of experiments. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN431. HYDRO- AND ELECTRO-METALLURGY. 3.0 Hours. (I) Physicochemical principles associated with the extraction and refining of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical techniques. Discussion of unit processes in hydrometallurgy, electrowinning, and electrorefining. Analysis of integrated flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals. Prerequisites: MTGN334, MTGN351 and MTGN352. Co-requisite: MTGN461, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN432. PYROMETALLURGY. 3.0 Hours. (II) Extraction and refining of metals including emerging practices. Modifications driven by environmental regulations and by energy minimization. Analysis and design of processes and the impact of economic constraints. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN461. Transport Phenomena And Reactor Design For Metallurgical And Materials Engineers(I) Introduction to the conserved-quantities: momentum, heat, and mass transfer, and application of chemical kinetics to elementary reactor-design. Examples from materials processing and process metallurgy. Molecular transport properties: viscosity, thermal conductivity, and mass diffusivity of materials encountered during processing operations. Unidirectional transport: problem formulation based on the required balance of the conserved- quantity applied to a control-volume. Prediction of velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. Equations of change: continuity, motion, and energy. Transport with two independent variables (unsteady-state behavior). Interphase transport: dimensionless correlations friction factor, heat, and mass transfer coefficients. Elementary concepts of radiation heat-transfer. Flow behavior in packed beds. Design equations for: continuous- flow/batch reactors with uniform dispersion and plug flow reactors. Digital computer methods for the design of metallurgical systems. Prerequisites: MATH225, MTGN334 and MTGN352. Co-requisite: MTGN461L. 2 hours lecture, 2 semester hours.
  • MTGN466. Materials Design: Synthesis, Characterization And Selection(II) (WI) Application of fundamental materials-engineering principles to the design of systems for extraction and synthesis, and to the selection of materials. Systems covered range from those used for metallurgical processing to those used for processing of emergent materials. Microstructural design, characterization and properties evaluation provide the basis for linking synthesis to applications. Selection criteria tied to specific requirements such as corrosion resistance, wear and abrasion resistance, high temperature service, cryogenic service, vacuum systems, automotive systems, electronic and optical systems, high strength/weight ratios, recycling, economics and safety issues. Materials investigated include mature and emergent metallic, ceramic and composite systems used in the manufacturing and fabrication industries. Student-team design activities including oral- and written reports. Prerequisite: MTGN351, MTGN352, MTGN445 and MTGN461 or consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

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GRADUATE LEVEL COURSES

  • MTGN531. Thermodynamics Of Metallurgical And Materials Processing. 3.0 Hours.(I) Application of thermodynamics to the processing of metals and materials, with emphasis on the use of thermodynamics in the development and optimization of processing systems. Focus areas will include entropy and enthalpy, reaction equilibrium, solution thermodynamics, methods for analysis and correlation of thermodynamics data, thermodynamic analysis of phase diagrams, thermodynamics of surfaces, thermodynamics of defect structures, and irreversible thermodynamics. Attention will be given to experimental methods for the measurement of thermodynamic quantities. Prerequisite: MTGN351 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN532. PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING I - COMMINUTION AND PHYSICAL SEPARATIONS. 3.0 Hours. An introduction to the fundamental principles and design criteria for the selection and use of standard mineral processing unit operations in comminution and physical separation. Topics covered include: crushing (jaw, cone, gyratory), grinding (ball, pebble, rod, SAG, HPGR), screening, thickening, sedimentation, filtration and hydrocyclones. Two standard mineral processing plant-design simulation software (MinOCad and JK SimMet) are used in the course. Prerequisites: Graduate or Senior in good- standing or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN533. PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING II - APPLIED SEPARATIONS. 3.0 Hours. An introduction to the fundamental principles and design criteria for the selection and use of standard mineral processing unit operations in applied separations. Topics covered include: photometric ore sorting, magnetic separation, dense media separation, gravity separation, electrostatic separation and flotation (surface chemistry, reagents selection, laboratory testing procedures, design and simulation). Two standard mineral processing plant-design simulation software (MinOCad and JK SimMet) are used in the course. Graduate or Senior in good- standing or consent of instructor.3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN535. Pyrometallurgical Processes. 3.0 Hours.(II) Detailed study of a selected few processes, illustrating the application of the principles of physical chemistry (both thermodynamics and kinetics) and chemical engineering (heat and mass transfer, fluid flow, plant design, fuel technology, etc.) to process development. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • MTGN537. Electrometallurgy. 3.0 Hours.(II) Electrochemical nature of metallurgical processes. Kinetics of electrode reactions. Electrochemical oxidation and reduction. Complex electrode reactions. Mixed potential systems. Cell design and optimization of electrometallurgical processes. Batteries and fuel cells. Some aspects of corrosion. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years only.).
  • MTGN538. Hydrometallurgy. 3.0 Hours.(II)  Kinetics of liquid-solid reactions. Theory of uniformly accessible surfaces. Hydrometallurgy of sulfide and oxides. Cementation and hydrogen reduction. Ion exchange and solvent extraction. Physicochemical phenomena at high pressures. Microbiological metallurgy. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
  • MTGN554. Oxidation Of Metals. 3.0 Hours.(II) Kinetics of oxidation. The nature of the oxide film. Transport in oxides. Mechanisms of oxidation. The Oxidation protection of high temperature metal systems. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years only.)
  • MTGN 598 – Rare metals Extraction and Refining
  • MTGN631. Transport Phenomena In Metallurgical And Materials Systems. 3.0 Hours.  Physical principles of mass, momentum, and energy transport. Application to the analysis of extraction metallurgy and other physicochemical processes. Prerequisite: MATH225 and MTGN461or equivalent, or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

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Chemistry Engineering

  • CBEN200. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours. Fundamentals of computer programming as applied to the solution of chemical engineering problems. Introduction to Visual Basic, computational methods and algorithm development. Prerequisite: MATH112 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN210. INTRO TO THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours. (I, II) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical engineering thermodynamics. Application of mass and energy balances to closed and open systems including systems undergoing transient processes. Entropy generation and the second law of thermodynamics for closed and open systems. Introduction to phase equilibrium and chemical reaction equilibria. Ideal solution behavior. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124, MATH111, MATH112, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Students with credit in CHGN209 may not also receive credit in CBEN210.
  • CBEN250. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 3.0 Hours. Introduction to chemical process industries and how analysis and design concepts guide the development of new processes and products. Use of simple mathematical models to describe the performance of common process building blocks including pumps, heat exchangers, chemical reactors, and separators. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CBEN210 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN307. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours. (I) This course covers theory and application of momentum transfer and fluid flow. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work also includes computational fluid dynamics. Prerequisites: MATH225, grade of C- or better in CBEN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN308. HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours. (II) This course covers theory and applications of energy transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and their application to macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work also includes application of relevant numerical methods to solve heat transfer problems. Prerequisites: MATH225, grade of C- or better in CBEN307. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN375. MASS TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours. (II) This course covers fundamentals of stage-wise and diffusional mass transport with applications to chemical engineering systems and processes. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation and computational methods are incorporated. Prerequisites: grade of C- or better in CBEN357. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN401. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN. 3.0 Hours. (I) This course introduces skills and knowledge required to develop conceptual designs of new processes and tools to analyze troubleshoot, and optimize existing processes. Prerequisites: CBEN201, CBEN308, CBEN307, CBEN357, CBEN375 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN418. KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours. (I) (WI) This course emphasizes applications of the fundamentals of thermodynamics, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, and material and energy balances to the engineering of reactive processes. Key topics include reactor design, acquisition and analysis of rate data, and heterogeneous catalysis. Computational methods as related to reactor and reaction modeling are incorporated. Prerequisites: CBEN308, CBEN357, MATH225, CHGN221, CHGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours. Formulation and solution of chemical engineering problems using numerical solution methods within the Excel and MathCAD environments. Setup and numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations for typical chemical engineering systems and transport processes. Prerequisite: MATH225, CHGN209 or CBEN210, CBEN307, CBEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours. (II) Time value of money concepts of present worth, future worth, annual worth, rate of return and break-even analysis applied to after-tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments. Related topics on proper handling of (1) inflation and escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk adjustment of analysis using expected value concepts, (4) mutually exclusive alternative analysis and service producing alternatives. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA. 3.0 Hours. (I) This course covers theory and applications of momentum, energy, and mass transfer based on microscopic control volumes. Analytical and numerical solution methods are employed in this course. Prerequisites: CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN357, CBEN375, MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN507. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours. This course stresses the application of mathematics to problems drawn from chemical engineering fundamentals such as material and energy balances, transport phenomena and kinetics. Formulation and solution of ordinary and partial differential equations arising in chemical engineering or related processes or operations are discussed. Mathematical approaches are restricted to analytical solutions or techniques for producing problems amenable to analytical solutions. Prerequisite: Undergraduate differential equations course; undergraduate chemical engineering courses covering reaction kinetics, and heat, mass and momentum transfer. 3 hours lecture discussion; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN516. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA. 3.0 Hours. Principles of momentum, heat, and mass transport with applications to chemical and biological processes. Analytical methods for solving ordinary and partial differential equations in chemical engineering with an emphasis on scaling and approximation techniques including singular and regular perturbation methods. Convective transport in the context of boundary layer theory and development of heat and mass transfer coefficients. Introduction to computational methods for solving coupled transport problems in irregular geometries. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
  • CBEN518. REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS. 3.0 Hours. Homogeneous and heterogeneous rate expressions. Fundamental theories of reaction rates. Analysis of rate data and complex reaction networks. Properties of solid catalysts. Mass and heat transfer with chemical reaction. Hetero geneous non-catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: CBEN418 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

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Mineral Economics and Business

  • EBGN310: ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS (F) Application of microeconomic theory to topics in environmental and resource economics. Topics include analysis of pollution control, benefit/cost analysis in decision-making and the associated problems of measuring benefits and costs, non-renewable resource extraction, measures of resource scarcity, renewable resource management, environmental justice, sustainability, and the analysis of environmental regulations and resource policies. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • EBGN330: ENERGY ECONOMICS-(F) Study of economic theories of optimal resource extraction, market power, market failure, regulation deregulation, technological change and resource scarcity. Economic tools used to analyze OPEC, energy mergers, natural gas price controls and deregulation, electric utility restructuring, energy taxes, environmental impacts of energy use, government R&D programs, and other energy topics. Prerequisites: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Public Policy Elective)
  • EBGN340: ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (1) This courswe considers the intersection of energy and environmental policy from an economic perspective. Policy issues addressed include climate change, renewable resources, externalities of energy use, transportation, and economic development and sustainability. Prerequites: EBGN 201. 3 lecture hours ;3 semester hours.
  • EBGN459: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT-(S) As a quantitative managerial course, the course will explore how firms can better organize their operations so that they more effectively align their supply with the demand for their products and services. Supply Chain Management (SCM) is concerned with the efficient integration of suppliers, factories, warehouses and retail-stores (or other forms of distribution channels) so that products are provided to customers in the right quantity and at the right time. Topics include managing economies of scale for functional products, managing market-mediation costs for innovative products, make-to order versus make-to-stock systems, quick response strategies, risk pooling strategies, supply-chain contracts and revenue management. Additional “special topics” will also be introduced, such as reverse logistics issues in the supply-chain or contemporary operational and financial hedging strategies. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
  • EBGN470: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS-(F) This course considers the role of markets as they relate to the environment. Topics discussed include environmental policy and economic incentives, market and non-market approaches to pollution regulation, property rights and the environment, the use of benefit/cost analysis in environmental policy decisions, and methods for measuring environmental and non-market values. prerequisite: EBGN 301. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
  • EBGN510 NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS-The threat and theory of resource exhaustion; commodity analysis and the problem of mineral market instability; cartels and nature of mineral pricing; the environment; government involvement; mineral policy issues; and international mineral trade. This course is designed for entering students in mineral and energy economics. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics or permission of instructor.

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