CMI Education Partner: Iowa State University

Iowa State University offers courses in several areas:


http://catalog.iastate.edu/collegescurricula/
Course could be changed semester by semester. The list below is based on general information of Iowa State University.

Materials Engineering

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

  • MAT E 214. Structural Characterization of Materials. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: MAT E 215, credit or enrollment in PHYS 221 Structural characterization of ceramic, electronic, polymeric and metallic materials. Techniques include optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis. Identification of materials type, microstructure, and crystal structure.
  • MAT E 273. Principles of Materials Science and Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Sophomore classification; CHEM 167 or CHEM 177; MATH 165 Introduction to the structure and properties of engineering materials. Structure of crystalline solids and imperfections. Atomic diffusion. Mechanical properties and failure of ductile and brittle materials. Dislocations and strengthening mechanisms. Phase equilibria, phase transformations, microstructure development, and heat treatment principles of common metallurgical systems including steels and aluminum alloys. Structure and mechanical properties of ceramic, polymeric and composite materials. Thermal properties of materials. Corrosion and degradation. Basic electronic properties of materials. Engineering applications. Only one of Mat E 215, 272, 273. or 392 may count toward graduation.
  • MAT E 311. Thermodynamics in Materials Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CHEM 178, credit or enrollment in MAT E 216, PHYS 222, and MATH 267 Basic laws of thermodynamics applied to phase equilibria, transformations, and reactions in multicomponent multiphase materials systems; Thermodynamic descriptions of heterogeneous systems; Binary and ternary phase diagrams; interfaces, surfaces, and defects.
  • MAT E 317. Introduction to Electronic Properties of Ceramic, Metallic, and Polymeric Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MAT E 216 and PHYS 222 Materials Engineering majors only. Introduction to electronic properties of materials and their practical applications. Classical conduction models and electronic properties of metallic and ceramic materials. Elementary quantum mechanics and band theory of electron states in solids. Quantum theory of metallic conduction. Elementary semiconductor theory and devices. Polarization and dielectric properties of materials. Electron conduction in polymeric systems. Magnetic properties and applications of metals and ceramics.
  • MAT E 334. Electronic & Magnetic Properties of Metallic Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MAT E 317 Electronic conduction in metals and the properties of conducting materials. Quantum mechanical behavior of free electrons and electrons in potentials wells, bonds and lattices. Development of the band theory of electron states in solids and the Free and Nearly Free Electron models. Density-of-states in energy bands and the Fermi-Dirac statistics of state occupancy. Quantum mechanical model of metallic conduction; Brillouin zones and Fermi surfaces. Additional topics include the thermal properties of metals, electron phase transitions in metallic alloys and the BCS theory of superconductivity. Classical and quantum mechanical treatment of the origins of magnetism in materials; orbital and spin angular momentum. Theory of magnetic behavior in dia-, para-magnetic, ferromagnetic materials.
  • MAT E 341. Metals Processing. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 215 or 273 or 392, Mat E majors only Theory and practice of metal processing, including casting; powder metallurgy; additive manufacturing; rolling; forging; extrusion; drawing; material removal ; joining; surface modification; and heat treatment. Use of processing software.
  • MAT E 401. Materials Engineering Professional Planning. Cr. R. F. Prereq: Senior classification in materials engineering Preparation for a career in materials engineering or graduate school; experiential learning, resumes, interviewing, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, leadership, international opportunities, professional ethics, graduate school preparation and opportunities, and alternative career paths (med school, law school, etc.). Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.
  • MAT E 413. Materials Design and Professional Practice I. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Senior status in Mat E Fundamentals of materials engineering design, information sources, team behavior, professional preparation, quantitative design including finite-element analysis and computer aided design, materials selection, informatics and combinatorial methods. Analysis of design problems, development of solutions, selected case studies. Oral presentation skills. Preparations for spring project.
  • MAT E 414. Materials Design and Professional Practice II. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Senior status in Mat E Integration of materials processing, structure/composition, properties and performance principles in materials engineering problems. Multi-scale design of materials, materials processing, case studies including cost analysis, ethics, risk and safety. Team projects specified by either industry or academic partners. Written and oral final project reports.
  • MAT E 418. Mechanical Behavior of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MAT E 216 and credit or enrollment in E M 324 Mechanical behavior of ceramics, metals, polymers, and composites. Relationships between materials processing and atomic aspects of elasticity, plasticity, fracture, and fatigue. Life prediction, stress-and failure analysis.
  • MAT E 481. Computational Modeling of Materials. (Dual-listed with M S E 581). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 265 and (MatE 311 or ChE 381 or CHEM 325 or PHYS 304) Introduction to the basic methods used in the computational modeling and simulation of materials, from atomistic simulations to methods at the mesoscale. Students will be expected to develop and run sample programs. Topics to be covered include, for example, electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, phase-field methods, etc.

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Materials Science and Engineering

Graduate level courses.

Online courses can be found at: http://courses.elo.iastate.edu/?dept=M%20S%20E&term=fall2015

  • M S E 510. Fundamentals of Structure and Chemistry of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 165, PHYS 221, and CHEM 167 Geometric and algebraic representations of symmetry. Pair distribution function. Structure, chemistry, and basic properties of covalent, ionic, and metallic solids, glasses and liquids, and polymers. Interactions of materials with particles and waves. Relationships between direct and reciprocal spaces. The kinematical theory of diffraction, with an introduction to the dynamical theory.
  • M S E 519. Magnetism and Magnetic Materials. (Cross-listed with E E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: E E 311 or MAT E 317 or PHYS 364 Magnetic fields, flux density and magnetization. Magnetic materials, magnetic measurements. Magnetic properties of materials. Domains, domain walls, domain processes, magnetization curves and hysteresis. Types of magnetic order, magnetic phases and critical phenomena. Magnetic moments of electrons, theory of electron magnetism. Technological application, soft magnetic materials for electromagnets, hard magnetic materials, permanent magnets, magnetic recording technology, magnetic measurements of properties for materials evaluation.
  • M S E 540. Mechanical Behavior of Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MAT E 418, MATH 266 or MATH 267 Mechanical behavior of materials with emphasis on micromechanics of deformation in three generic regimes: elasticity, plasticity, and fracture. A materials science approach is followed to understand and model the mechanical behavior that combines continuum mechanics, thermodynamics, kinetics, and microstructure. Some topics include elastic properties of materials, permanent deformation mechanisms at different temperatures (e.g., via dislocation motion and creep), and fracture in ductile and brittle materials. Specific classes of materials that are studied: metals, ceramics, polymers, glasses and composites.
  • M S E 557. Chemical and Physical Metallurgy of Rare Earth Metals. (Dual-listed with MAT E 457). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: MAT E 311 or CHEM 325 AND CHEM 324 orPHYS 322 Electronic configuration, valence states, minerals, ores, beneficiation, extraction, separation, metal preparation and purification. Crystal structures, phase transformations and polymorphism, and thermochemical properties of rare earth metals. Chemical properties: inorganic and organometallic compounds, alloy chemistry, nature of the chemical bonding. Physical properties: mechanical and elastic properties, magnetic properties, resistivity, and superconductivity.
  • M S E 564. Fracture and Fatigue. (Cross-listed with AER E, E M, M E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: E M 324 and either MAT E 216 orMAT E 273 or MAT E 392. Undergraduates: Permission of instructor Materials and mechanics approach to fracture and fatigue. Fracture mechanics, brittle and ductile fracture, fracture and fatigue characteristics, fracture of thin films and layered structures. Fracture and fatigue tests, mechanics and materials designed to avoid fracture or fatigue.

Also, for Spring 2016, Vitalij Pecharsky is scheduled to teach MSE 557, which is offered every other spring:

  • M S E 557. Chemical and Physical Metallurgy of Rare Earth Metals. (Dual-listed with MAT E 457). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: MAT E 311 or CHEM 325 AND CHEM 324 or PHYS 322  Electronic configuration, valence states, minerals, ores, beneficiation, extraction, separation, metal preparation and purification. Crystal structures, phase transformations and polymorphism, and thermochemical properties of rare earth metals. Chemical properties: inorganic and organometallic compounds, alloy chemistry, nature of the chemical bonding. Physical properties: mechanical and elastic properties, magnetic properties, resistivity, and superconductivity.

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Geology

Online course can be found at: http://courses.elo.iastate.edu/?term=fall2015&dept=GEOL

  • GEOL 201. Geology for Engineers and Environmental Scientists. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Introduction to Earth materials and processes with emphasis on engineering and environmental applications.
  • GEOL 315. Mineralogy and Earth Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201, CHEM 177 Introduction to mineral classification, elementary crystal chemistry, crystal growth and morphology, mineral stability, and mineral associations.
  • GEOL 324. Energy and the Environment. (Cross-listed with ENSCI, ENV S, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Renewable and non-renewable energy resources. Origin, occurrence, and extraction of fossil fuels. Nuclear, wind, geothermal, biomass, hydroelectric, and solar energy. Biofuels. Energy efficiency. Environmental effects of energy production and use, including air pollution, acid precipitation, coal ash, mountaintop removal mining, oil drilling, hydraulic fracturing, groundwater contamination, nuclear waste disposal, and global climate change. Carbon sequestration and geoengineering solutions for reducing atmospheric CO2 concentrations.
  • GEOL 356. Structural Geology. (3-6) Cr. 5. S. Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201; PHYS 111 Principles of stress and strain. Brittle and ductile behavior of rocks. Description, classification, and mechanics of formation of fractures, faults, folds, foliation, and lineation. Plate tectonics and regional geology. Laboratory includes application of geometrical techniques to solve structural problems; emphasizes map interpretation and use of stereonet and computer methods.
  • GEOL 365. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology.
  • GEOL 420. Mineral Resources. (Dual-listed with GEOL 520). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: GEOL 365 Geology and geochemistry of non-metallic and metallic ore deposits. Major processes that concentrate metals in the Earth. Geochemical conditions of ore formation using stable-isotope and fluid-inclusion studies. Laboratory emphasizes the study of metallic ores.
  • GEOL 451. Applied and Environmental Geophysics. (Dual-listed with GEOL 551). (Cross-listed with ENSCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201, college algebra and trigonometry Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface
  • GEOL 520. Mineral Resources. (Dual-listed with GEOL 420). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: GEOL 365 Geology and geochemistry of non-metallic and metallic ore deposits. Major processes that concentrate metals in the Earth. Geochemical conditions of ore formation using stable-isotope and fluid-inclusion studies. Laboratory emphasizes the study of metallic ores.

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Recycling/Industrial Engineering

  • I E 403. Introduction to Sustainable Production Systems. (Dual-listed with I E 503). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: Credit or enrollment I E 341  Quantitative introduction of sustainability concepts in production planning and inventory control. Review of material recovery (recycling) and product/component recovery (remanufacturing) from productivity perspectives. Sustainability rubrics ranging from design and process to systems. Application to multi-echelon networks subject to forward/backward flow of material and information. Closed-loop supply chains. Comparative study of sustainable vs. traditional models for local and global production systems.

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Chemistry

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

  • CH E 104. Chemical Engineering Learning Community. Cr. R. F.S. Prereq: Enrollment in Chemical Engineering Learning Team (1-0) Curriculum in career planning and academic course support for Freshmen learning team.
  • CH E 310. Computational Methods in Chemical Engineering. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: CH E 210 and CH E 160 Numerical methods for solving systems of linear and nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, numerical differentiation and integration, and nonlinear regression using chemical engineering examples.
  • CH E 358. Separations. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: CH E 310, CH E 357 Diffusion and mass transfer in fluids. Analysis and design of continuous contacting and multistage separation processes. Binary and multicomponent distillation, absorption, extraction, evaporation, membrane processes, and simultaneous heat and mass transfer.
  • CH E 408. Surface and Colloid Chemistry. (Dual-listed with CH E 508). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: CH E 381 or equivalent Examines the factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with an emphasis on the thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena. Application areas include emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, and electrophoresis.
  • CH E 421. Process Control. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: CH E 358, CH E 382, MATH 267 Control of industrial chemical processes. Device applications and limitations. Dynamics of chemical process components and process control systems.
  • CH E 430. Process and Plant Design. (2-6) Cr. 4. F.S. Prereq: CH E 358, CH E 382 Synthesis of chemical engineering processes, equipment and plants. Cost estimation and feasibility analysis.
  • CH E 508. Surface and Colloid Chemistry. (Dual-listed with CH E 408). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: CH E 381 or equivalent Examines the factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with an emphasis on the thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena. Application areas include emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, and electrophoresis.

For online offer, please visit http://courses.elo.iastate.edu/?dept=M%20E&term=fall2015

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